Are you under pressure?

Are you under pressure?

It’s the time of year when the pressure is really building up at work, often in preparation for a rest period over summer. Spring is almost over, which is typically a very busy and stressful time for farmers, but the back log of work to be completed before some employees take time off around Christmas can mean the pressure gets to employers and employees alike.

To help alleviate your high stress levels, we’ve investigated the key stressors in the workplace and researched five tools to fix the problem. Read our blog 5 ways to Avoid Burnout to find out more.

Beware of visa slowdown period

Many of you will be taking a break over the summer period, and production will also wind back a bit. Unfortunately, the same thing happens with visa processing times!

Last year we experienced some significant delays with visa processing over the summer period (November to March), and we recommend that if you know you will need visas approved over the January/February period, to act now to avoid inconvenient delays and ensure visas are lodged and approved in time.

This won’t affect those employees who are staying with the same employer but if you are on an interim visa, travelling home is not recommended because the visas can take far too long to approve.

For those changing employers, it can also cause some issues around not being able to work until the new visa is approved, so if this affects you, talk to your employer or CC Recruitment about how we can mitigate a delay in acquiring your new work visa.

Are you changing employer?

If you have plans to change employer, you will need to secure a new Essential Skills Work visa for your new position. You will also have to give the correct termination notice period to your current employer.

CC Recruitment often deals with renewing visas when the employee is changing employer, and we find a common issue that crops up is that the new visa is not approved before the end of the notice period for the existing employer. Legally an employee is only allowed to work for the employer stated on their visa, and therefore cannot continue working for their current employer once the new visa has been approved.

At CC Recruitment, we attempt to time the process so that the employee gives the correct termination notice period and receives the new visa at the end of it. However, as we all know, visa processing times are not standard and the timing is not always perfect.

However, recently we received an Essential Skills Work Visa approval that stated:

Note on conditions of visa

The conditions of your work visa state that you may only work for **NEW EMPLOYER**. However, if required, you may continue to work for **CURRENT EMPLOYER** for the duration of your termination notice period required under your previous employment agreement.

If the above statement becomes standard across all visa approvals, then it will alleviate this problem, which would be great news! However, as always, we are treading with caution and will continue best practice, by attempting to time termination notice periods with the beginning of the new visa contract.

We’ll keep you updated on any official changes.

New herd manager to the rescue!

When you have four young children and run a 500 cow dairy farm, there really isn’t enough time in the day to search for new staff, says Otorohanga dairy farmer Carey Gray.

So when she and her husband were down two staff members late in the busy season, they decided to consider recruiting Filipino workers to fill the gap. They sourced one migrant worker themselves and then engaged CC Recruitment to bring in another worker – Gerard Gabito from Sorsogon in the Philippines.

As it happened Gerard knew the other migrant worker from a previous job and it has made his transition into his new job easy. He chose to come to New Zealand because “working in New Zealand is just like travelling – so many beautiful places, good people and also I can have the opportunity to work to be a resident here for my family”.

Gerard loves everything about being the herd manager at the Otorohanga dairy farm.

“Being a farmer is a big responsibility – working with cows makes me happy, seeing them healthy and collecting their milk so we could feed the world. I’m just a farmer with an awesome job!”

Carey is enthusiastic about her new recruits, too.

“They’ve been fantastic so far, they’ve adjusted so well, living together and really enjoying it and they’re great on the farm – no concerns at all!”

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